August 24, 2012

Can Cats have Allergies? Yes!

Filed under: Cat Allergies,Dr. Loridawn's Lessons — Tags: — Dr. Loridawn Gordon @ 11:20 am

cat allergiesWhile many people find themselves allergic to cats, felines themselves are not immune to the effects of allergies either.

Cat allergy symptoms can range from a mild nuisance to ones causing serious bodily harm.  Here’s what you need to know to keep your cat’s fur healthy and itch-free.

About Flea Allergies in Cats

Flea allergies in cats are quite common.

Normally a flea bite causes mild topical itching, quite similar to a mosquito bite. But, in the case of a cat allergic to fleas, the itching can be so extreme that the cat can severely scratch or chew itself.

This can lead to open sores, missing patches of hair, and other symptoms.

Cat flea allergy treatment involves handling a flea infestation first and foremost, but also includes anti-itch remedies if severe enough.

About Food Allergies in Cats

Food Allergies in cats usually develop over time.  Most often these allergies are to meat, such as beef, pork, and chicken.

Cat food allergies can provoke skin itchiness and gastrointestinal upset. If you see excessive itching or foul smells after mealtime, it may be time to take action.

Dealing with cat allergies is simple, and much the same as is done with humans—find the allergen responsible and remove it from the cat’s diet. However, finding a food that your cat can eat may prove to be a challenge.

And if your cat is a picky eater, it could be even harder.

About Pollen Allergies in Cats

Pollen allergies certainly exist in cats. Unfortunately, our feline friends are not immune to what some have called nature’s super-allergen.

Allergenic pollen for cats comes from the same “usual suspects” as for humans: trees, grass, and flowers.

But unlike humans, cats have much more at risk. Instead of suffering ‘hay-fever’ effects, cats can experience full-body itching that often times requires anti-itch treatment or a cat allergy shot.

About Skin Allergies in Cats

Contact allergies are the rarest amongst cats, and are caused when a cat physically touches something it’s allergic to. The likely culprits: carpet, wool bedding, and detergents.

Unlike the cat allergies I already mentioned, the effect is usually confined to an irritated patch of skin. The most common contact areas are the elbows, bottom of the feet, and the belly.

Fortunately, cat skin allergy treatment is easy. It’s the same as with cat food allergies: just find the offending material and get it out of the picture.

 

Dr. Loridawn Gordon

November 16, 2011

What You Need To Know About Cat Allergies

Filed under: Cat Allergies — Tags: — 1st Pet Naturals @ 12:25 am

Can Cats have Allergies? Yes!

While many people find themselves allergic to the felines, environmental cat allergies can pose a threat to your pet. Cat allergy symptoms can range from a mild nuisance to causing serious bodily harm. Here’s what you need to know to keep your cat healthy and itch-free.

important information about feline allergies

Cat Flea Allergy

– Flea allergies in cats are the most common form of allergen. Normally a flea bite causes mild topical itching, quite similar to a flea bite on a dog. In the case of a cat allergic to fleas, however, the itching can be so extreme that the cat can severely scratch or chew itself leading to open sores, missing patches of hair, and other symptoms. Cat flea allergy treatment usually consists of a pill, or liquid in the form of drops.

Cat Food Allergy

– Food Allergies in cats usually develop over time. Most often these are allergies to meat: beef, pork, and chicken are the most common. Cat food allergies can provoke skin itchiness and gastrointestinal upset; so if you see excessive itching or foul smells after mealtime, it may be time to take action. Dealing with cat allergies is easy, and much the same as is done with humans—find the allergen responsible and remove it from the cat’s diet.

Cat Airborne Allergy

– Pollen allergies certainly exist in cats; unfortunately they are not immune to nature’s super-allergen. Allergenic pollen can come from the usual places: trees, glass, and flowers, but unlike humans, cats as much more at risk. Instead of suffering hay-fever type effects localized to one area, cats experience full-body itching that often times requires a cat flea shampoo, skin testing, or a cat allergy shot.

Cat Skin Allergy

– Contact allergies are the rarest amongst cats, and are caused by physical contact with your cat and one of a few likely culprits: carpet, wool bedding, and detergents. Unlike the aforementioned cat allergies, the effect is usually localized to an irritated patch of skin. The most common contact areas are the elbows, bottom of the feet, and the belly. Fortunately, cat skin allergy treatment is easy; it requires same procedure as with cat food allergies: simply find the material that is the culprit, and remove it from the cat’s habitat

Disclaimer: 1st Pet Naturals is an education resource, and all information herein is strictly for educational purposes. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure disease, nor is it meant to replace the (prescribed) treatment or recommendations of your veterinarian or healthcare provider. Always inform your veterinarian or healthcare provider of any products that your pet is taking, including herbal remedies and supplements.